Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Primark is a Supporting Partner of the Circular Fashion Partnership, a cross-sectorial project to support the development of the textile recycling industry in Bangladesh by capturing and directing post-production fashion waste back into the production of new fashion products. Below we learn how the partnership has made an impact at Primark.

The importance of a circular fashion system for Primark

 

For Primark, a circular fashion ecosystem (aka circularity) is where materials and products are kept in use for longer – put simply, reducing, reusing, and recycling materials. Becoming a more circular business is a key part of the Primark Cares sustainability strategy – the company has committed to making clothes that will last longer, are designed to be recycled, and are made from recycled fibres or more sustainably sourced materials. This is about minimising – and, ultimately, removing – waste in textiles at the start and end of a garment’s life. Primark has been working hard to become a more sustainable business for over a decade but its Primark Cares strategy – launched last year – accelerated this. The organisation has set itself ambitious commitments to change its business model. This includes changing the way Primark makes and sources its products, with a big focus on circularity.

Primark recently appointed a Circular Product Lead to manage this work internally and has begun to train its denim and jersey buying teams, in addition to suppliers, in circular design principles. The brand also views circularity as an enabler to reduce its impact on the planet as an industry and to support Primark’s commitment to halve its carbon footprint by 2030. Over time, Primark hopes to move to a closed loop system, turning old clothes into new, allowing it to increase its use of recycled materials. However, the organisation recognises that the technology to do this is still in its infancy. Nonetheless, Primark is doing what it can to test new innovations, build new partnerships and lead change. This can’t happen overnight, but as the industry evolves and new innovation scales, Primark intends to evolve with it.

Barriers to scaling effective circular systems

Primark recognises that circularity requires a change in mindset and that everyone in the supply chain has the responsibility to change their habits. Like any initiative which requires a change in process or operation, it takes time to implement. With the Circular Fashion Partnership, Primark is engaging with parts of the supply chain that historically it may not have had relationships with, like waste handlers and recyclers. Getting to know how they work has been truly insightful for the organisation and has provided a deeper understanding that the industry must work together to make the change that is required.

To scale effective circular systems, Primark reiterates the need for collaboration. Brands, manufacturers, waste handlers and recyclers need to agree on issues such as waste traceability and output quality – both of which are key to scaling effective circular systems. However, Primark is a large company and the small changes it makes can deliver a huge impact. Therefore, the organisation is committed to utilising Primark’s scale to help deliver change in this space.

Primark’s Circular Fashion Partnership Activities

The Circular Fashion Partnership, led by Global Fashion Agenda, has given Primark the opportunity to explore how it can close the loop, working with some of its suppliers to reframe what it would traditionally have described as ‘waste’ as a new resource instead. The Reverse Resources team have been integral to the Partnership, supporting Primark’s suppliers to segregate their post-industrial textile waste, by colour and composition, so that their textile waste can be matched with a recycler to make new fibres.

When Primark joined the partnership in 2021, it wanted to learn more about the waste infrastructure in Bangladesh and take the learnings to support its ambitions around the Primark Cares strategy and the work it can do with suppliers in this space. Primark worked with three of its suppliers to start this journey and by working together, identified a few key impacts, including:

Better Handling: waste management practices in Primark’s suppliers’ factories improved.

Waste Segregation: waste segregation plays a major role in this project and these factories are now segregating the textile waste according to colour and composition, keeping the textile waste scraps separate from other waste.

Waste Storage: the factories are now storing the textile waste in separate storage areas to avoid contamination. 

Record Keeping: the factories are encouraged to keep an accurate record of waste generation, waste composition, colours etc. and the percentage of waste supplied for recycling. They provide all of this data in the Reverse Resources platform.

Traceability: there is complete traceability of waste through the Reverse Resources platform.

Transparency: the factories can identify which recyclers can process their textile waste.

Recycling: one factory has already shipped around 40 tonnes of textile waste, which is 22% of their total waste.

Advance Payment: in this project, factories get the waste value equal to the market value.

Primark’s established environmental sustainability team continue to work with its suppliers on the ground to implement these practices and the organisation is identifying ways to apply these learnings in other sourcing countries.

Nicole Morarescu Materials & Circularity Manager, Primark
"A huge THANK YOU to Global Fashion Agenda for convening a number of cross-sectoral stakeholders to bring this partnership to life, addressing some very difficult challenges which we cannot answer alone. This partnership has been a true representation of collaboration and impact. We look forward to continuing this work with Global Fashion Agenda, Reverse Resources and our suppliers."

About Primark

Primark is a leading international clothing retailer employing more than 70,000 colleagues in 14 countries – and growing. Affordability has always been at the heart of Primark. Its vision now is to make more sustainable fashion affordable for everyone. Primark is focused on giving its clothing a longer life, protecting life on the planet, and improving the lives of the people who make its clothes. That’s why Primark has set out to change the way its clothes are made with the Primark Cares strategy, a wide-reaching programme of commitments that Primark is working to achieve by 2030.

Primark is one of Global Fashion Agenda’s Supporting Partners for the Circular Fashion Partnership. Read more about the Circular Fashion Partnership and its various partners here

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Benetton Group is a Supporting Partner of the Circular Fashion Partnership, a cross-sectorial project to support the development of the textile recycling industry in Bangladesh by capturing and directing post-production fashion waste back into the production of new fashion products. Below we learn how the partnership has made an impact at Benetton Group.

The importance of a circular fashion system for Benetton Group

 

The opening sentence of Benetton Group’s manifesto is ‘Fashion is not everything’ – the company believes in more than just designing clothes, but also in a future that is sustainable, circular and regenerative.

Following this philosophy, Benetton Group has embraced different systemic initiatives aimed at a significant shift from a linear to a circular business model. It has introduced a strategy, as opposed to a single project, as it recognises that reaching this objective requires a structured approach rather than an occasional effort. The company has involved its stakeholders, instead of proceeding alone, based on the belief that all actors, from suppliers to final consumers, should contribute to make change happen.

Circularity, recycling and designing for durability are the Northern star in Benetton Group’s journey. It has adopted a strategic and pragmatic approach, leveraging on the skills and competences of its team and applying a new circular vision to its business, suppliers’ conduct and consumers’ habits. At the core of the company’s holistic strategy is its commitment to long-term sustainability.

This approach requires a shift in the way the company designs clothes – intentionally prioritising mono-material products that it finds to be more easily recyclable with the current state of technology. Regarding materials selection, Benetton has increased the recycled content of its products whilst maintaining a strong commitment towards the adoption of natural fibres.

Benetton Group’s B-long project is an investment in the durability of its products – ensuring they meet the highest quality manufacturing standard. The company engages with its consumers through B-care, an initiative aimed at teaching citizens how to take care of their clothes, so that they can last longer.

Benetton Group’s Circular Fashion Partnership Activities

Benetton Group is a partner of the Circular Fashion Partnership, supporting the development of textile recycling in Bangladesh, using waste from production processes to make new products. Whilst the company recognises that key barriers exist, such as scaling suitable technologies to recycle polyfibre materials, the availability of adequate waste recycling vendors and the lack of concrete policies, Benetton Group believes that we need to start reimagining the entire production process in order to recognise the value of textile waste.

The Circular Fashion Partnership facilitates commercial and circular collaborations between textile industries, fashion brands and recycling experts in Bangladesh, with a goal to generate economic value in the country by boosting the market for recycled fibres. In 2021, some of Benetton Group’s suppliers joined the initiative and, after training, began collecting cotton production waste for subsequent re-sale and recycling.

Nicoletta Sartori Head of Sustainability, Benetton Group
"Working towards a circular fashion system is rooted in our history. Our commitment to using high-quality, mono-fibre garments has been a pillar of our strategy since the beginning of Benetton’s entrepreneurial history. In the past we were also among the first companies to test new strategies to extend a product’s life-cycle, such as a collection service for second-hand garments, back in the Nineties. Today, we apply the same philosophy to the challenges that our industry is currently facing, as proud members of the Circular Fashion Partnership."

About Benetton Group

Benetton Group is a world-renowned fashion company, present in the most important markets globally with a network of about 4000 stores. Benetton prides itself on being a responsible group that plans for the future and lives in the present, with a watchful eye to the environment, to human dignity, and to a society in transformation.

Benetton Group is one of Global Fashion Agenda’s Supporting Partners for the Circular Fashion Partnership. Read more about the Circular Fashion Partnership and its various partners here

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Usha Yarns Limited is a Supporting Partner of the Circular Fashion Partnership, a cross-sectorial project to support the development of the textile recycling industry in Bangladesh by capturing and directing post-production fashion waste back into the production of new fashion products. Below we learn how the partnership has made an impact at Usha Yarns.

The importance of a circular fashion system for Usha Yarns

 

According to Usha Yarns, circular fashion is the only way out of the complex web of resource scarcity, landfills, pollution and plastic waste in this age of increasing global prosperity and fast fashion. As the importance and acceptance of recycling grows in the fashion industry, the company finds itself very much centre stage in the think of the action.

Barriers to scaling effective circular systems

For Usha Yarns, it is clear that scaling effective circular systems cannot be achieved without collaboration and alliances. Today, it recognises the desperate need for a much deeper collaboration between all stakeholders. According to the company, The Circular Fashion Partnership creates the groundwork for kickstarting and accelerating the cooperation between stakeholders in order to achieve the goals of a circular textile value chain.

Usha Yarns’ Circular Fashion Partnership Activities

As the demand for recycled textile materials grows, Usha Yarns has perfected its products and has furthermore embarked upon scaling up. It has initiated a circular partnership programme to connect with local garment producers and brands to support with the recycling and traceability of their waste.

Anurag Gupta Managing Director, Usha Yarns Limited
"We are thrilled to be part of Circular Fashion Partnership journey with immense opportunity of knowledge sharing, collaboration and learning provided to us by way of engaging with many brands and manufacturers seeking circularity solutions."

The Circular Fashion Partnership has given Usha Yarns a platform to network with brands, manufacturers and solution providers to collaborate and work together in a global space to overcome the challenges of transitioning to a circular economy.

About Usha Yarns

Usha Yarns Limited has a legacy of more than two decades in learning, developing and producing recycled textiles. Today, the company has three spinning plants in operation spread across 20 acres within the proximity of Chandigarh. The plants are modern and equipped with the best recycling technology driven by trusted brands like Rieter, Truetzschler, Oerlikon and Schlafhorst. The company has a monthly capacity to produce more than 1,000 tonnes of regenerated yarns in different solid and mélange colours, certified by Global Recycling Standards (GRS). The products are thoroughly examined on each quality parameter of global standards to ensure the complete satisfaction of customers. The company is an emerging brand in circular textiles, known for offering unique values like 100 per cent recycled content, big lot sizes, traceability, no colour variations and fine quality for both hosiery and woven applications which sets it apart from competitors

 

Usha Yarns is one of Global Fashion Agenda’s Supporting Partners for the Circular Fashion Partnership. Read more about the Circular Fashion Partnership and its various partners here

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

C&A is a Supporting Partner of the Circular Fashion Partnership, a cross-sectorial project to support the development of the textile recycling industry in Bangladesh by capturing and directing post-production fashion waste back into the production of new fashion products. Below we learn how the Circular Fashion Partnership has made an impact at C&A.

The importance of a circular fashion system for C&A

 

C&A’s vision is one of a restorative circular economy where nothing is wasted in the creation or disposal of clothing. The company believes that a circular fashion system presents an opportunity for the industry to re-invent itself and right its wrongs: using materials that are safe, renewable and restorative, focusing on physical and emotional product durability and ultimately closing the loop on textile-to-textile recycling. For C&A, a circular fashion system presents the opportunity to eliminate the concept of waste entirely.

Martha Willis Senior Manager, Sustainable Materials and Circular Innovation, C&A
"At C&A, we’re committed to connecting 7/10 products to a principle of circularity by 2028, including those made from recycled materials. The Circular Fashion Partnership is enabling us to establish a flow of high-quality recycled materials in our products and giving us the opportunity to collaborate across the supply chain to tackle barriers that still exist in circular systems."

Barriers to scaling effective circular systems

The team at C&A understand that a circular flow of materials is a key principle of the circular economy, yet they recognise significant technical barriers that exist in textile-to-textile recycling. In turn the company believes that we need investment in innovative solutions to accelerate recycling processes that preserve fibre quality, alongside establishing transparent high-quality waste flows. For C&A, policy is an important lever here, to present the concept of waste as a valuable resource and to support the development of infrastructure for the trading and recycling of waste.

Moreover, the company has identified the urgent need for mindset shifts in order to transition away from embedded industry practices that don’t support a circular economy. For C&A, increased collaboration and transparency along the entire value chain is a must.

C&A’s Circular Fashion Partnership Activities

By 2028, C&A is committed to connecting 7 out of 10 of its products to principles of circularity. Alongside circular product design and new business models, a key pillar of this goal is to focus on scaling high quality recycled materials within its supply chain. During the first phase of the Circular Fashion Partnership, C&A piloted the Reverse Resources platform with key suppliers in Bangladesh to trace clipping waste from garment manufacturing to recycling partners. The company is now in the second phase of the Circular Fashion Partnership, where it has scaled its programme of garment manufacturers, using the Reverse Resources platform to trace their waste.

The Circular Fashion Partnership has allowed C&A to test the hypothesis of a circular material loop, within a localised system. On one hand, it has demonstrated how the organisation can establish a transparent supply of high-quality post-industrial waste into C&A products. On the other hand, it has highlighted to the company the barriers and complexity – even in a localised system – that still exist within the industry to closing the material loop. C&A recognises that without further cross-sectoral collaboration, carving the way to a circular economy will not be possible.

About C&A

With over 1,300 stores in 17 European countries and more than 25,000 employees, C&A is one of Europe’s leading fashion retailers. Every day, C&A welcomes about two million visitors to its stores in Europe and offers quality fashion at affordable prices for the whole family. For further information, please visit our website: https://www.c-and-a.com

 

C&A is one of Global Fashion Agenda’s Supporting Partners for the Circular Fashion Partnership. Read more about the Circular Fashion Partnership and its various partners here

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

BESTSELLER is a Supporting Partner of the Circular Fashion Partnership, a cross-sectorial project to support the development of the textile recycling industry in Bangladesh by capturing and directing post-production fashion waste back into the production of new fashion products. Below we learn how the partnership has made an impact at BESTSELLER.

The importance of a circular fashion system for BESTSELLER

BESTSELLER believes that transitioning to circular fashion systems presents enormous potential for the company to lower its impact and become less dependent on virgin resources. This will require replacing the traditional linear model of take-make-waste with circular solutions that safeguard the world’s finite resources and eliminate waste. To be able to grow as an organisation, BESTSELLER recognises the need to rely more on circular fashion systems in the future to decouple turnover from its overall impact.

The BESTSELLER Sustainability Report 2021 outlines its ambitions to scale its circular systems, with the goal to phase out single use virgin plastic wherever possible by 2025. Its business model will be based on design principles that prioritise efficiency and the reuse of resources at every level, from fibres to water and chemicals to post-consumer, in order to minimise waste and keep resources in use.

Barriers to scaling effective circular systems

Based on learnings from the Circular Fashion Partnership, BESTSELLER identified that the key barrier to scaling effective circular systems in Bangladesh is the informal waste system. The company identifies that this needs to be addressed to complement its efforts and recognises the need to work together as an industry to build an infrastructure for pre-consumer waste which is inclusive of all stakeholders in the supply chain, without neglecting anyone. The purpose of this would be to make the supply chain more transparent and ensure that waste goes back into new products.

BESTSELLER’S Circular Fashion Partnership Activities

As part of the Circular Fashion Partnership, BESTSELLER has been – and still is – engaging with suppliers and recyclers to increase the use of pre-consumer waste – making sure that it ends up in new products. Together BESTSELLER wants to increase the mix of materials currently being used for recycling. Today, it identifies a high focus on only 100 percent cotton waste but wants to challenge the status quo and find a lasting destination for mixed materials as well.

Additionally, BESTSELLER – together with the manufacturers – makes sure that there are clear business incentives for the segregation and sorting of waste and supports the work to engage with the informal sector within circular fashion systems in Bangladesh.

Alexander Granberg Sustainability Project Specialist, BESTSELLER
"The Circular Fashion Partnership has been a perfect example of showing that when we as an industry join forces, agreeing on one agenda, we can drive real change. It’s clear that we need to collaborate on practical matters, and we believe that the potential within CFP is huge. We’re excited to take it to the next level."

About BESTSELLER

BESTSELLER is an international family-owned fashion company with a strong foundation. The company has more than 18,000 dedicated employees globally and  provides fashion clothing and accessories for all ages, genders and occasions.

BESTSELLER’s ultimate ambition is to bring ‘Fashion FWD’ until it is climate positive, fair for all and circular by design, and sees collaboration as the key to finding solutions and making lasting changes. With sustainability as a prerequisite for ongoing business success, BESTSELLER is investing in innovation and working in partnerships across the value chain.

For more information, visit bestseller.com

BESTSELLER is one of Global Fashion Agenda’s Supporting Partners for the Circular Fashion Partnership. Read more about the Circular Fashion Partnership and its various partners here

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Peak Performance is a Supporting Partner of the Circular Fashion Partnership, a cross-sectorial project to support the development of the textile recycling industry in Bangladesh by capturing and directing post-production fashion waste back into the production of new fashion products. Below we learn how the partnership has made an impact at Peak Performance.

The importance of a circular fashion system for Peak Performance

 

Peak Performance recognises the inflection point the fashion industry finds itself at – a pivotal moment of re-evaluation on how resources and products are considered. For the organisation, wasting finite materials is no longer an option – neither for people nor for the planet, and it acknowledges that the only way to stay within the planetary boundaries is to shift towards circularity.

The brands Sustainability Performance Report 2021 reiterated its devotion to reaching 100% circular product by 2030. Transitioning to a circular fashion system gives Peak Performance the opportunity to keep doing business without relying on nature to pay the price for it. The team at Peak Performance understand the complexity of this transition and the effort that is needed from growers, manufacturers, designers, end users, and everyone who is directly and indirectly involved in the process. They believe that the only way to succeed in this shift is by working together and educating everyone, including the end-user.

Sara Molnar Brand President, Peak Performance
" We need to think like one organism – evaluate every cell of the supply chain without forgetting our promise to the end consumer to make products that last and reimagine a healthy thriving fashion system."

Barriers to scaling effective circular systems

When we spoke to Peak Performance, they outlined three key barriers to scaling effective circular systems that must be addressed to complement their efforts:

  1. Transparency

For the brand, full supply chain transparency is key, both to understand the challenges but also to be able to communicate to and educate the end consumers. To address this, there needs to be a mindset shift around the value of resources and how we use them by implementing circular design practices within the product development process.

  1. Collaboration

The brand recognises that the research gap is still rather big, but that it will play a crucial role in the future. Accordingly, Peak Performance recognises that collaboration within the industry is imperative to push the limits of technological innovation. That’s precisely why it invests in projects like the Circular Fashion Partnership which provide a platform for sharing successes and mistakes and supporting each other.

  1. Waste handling

Handling, collecting and sorting post-consumer waste is another part of the challenge. However, this opens opportunities for new business models, which is something the brand will continue to explore going forward.

 

Peak Performance’s Circular Fashion Partnership Activities

Peak Performance has been a part of our Circular Fashion Partnership alongside various fibre recyclers and over 20 other brands sharing the passion of innovation, creativity, and new solutions. The result for Peak Performance was a t-shirt using around half of fibre-to-fibre recycled cotton – a great achievement in increasing the usage of circular materials. This is just the beginning as the brand seeks to continue this work.

Peak Performance will stay on as a Supporting Partner and is looking forward to the extension of program to Vietnam where a pre-feasibility study on synthetic material post-production waste has just been completed. Peak Performance believes synthetics are a massive part of the industry and has a goal to enable people to stay active, making this an exciting project with important findings for them.

The brand is delighted to be able to show progress in this field as it believes this is the future. Having some of its suppliers onboard to strengthen its collaboration and move forward together is something the organisation is proud of. Peak Performance testified just how much inspiration projects like this give its long-term partners and suppliers, as well as its own teams within the organisation. For the brand, this is a business opportunity with expansion in the right direction for the future.

About Peak Performance

Founded in 1986, Peak Performance was born out of a vision for stylish, functional, durable, timeless and high-quality skiwear. Now the brand is a frontrunner in designing innovative products for both a dynamic city life and outdoor activities such as skiing, running and golf.

 

Peak Performance is one of Global Fashion Agenda’s Supporting Partners for the Circular Fashion Partnership. Read more about the Circular Fashion Partnership and its various partners here

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

As Director of Primark Cares, Lynne Walker is responsible for transforming Primark Cares from a label to a value, leading a dedicated team and working closely with multiple others across the business to accelerate Primark’s decade-long sustainability journey.

Walker has held several senior positions at Primark and prior to her current role was Menswear Trading Director for seven years. Before joining Primark, Walker was with Next Retail for 16 years.

We recently onboarded Primark as a brand to our Circular Fashion Partnership, we asked Lynne Walker, Director of Primark Cares, five questions to find out more:

What inspired you to make a difference in the apparel industry?

“Primark has always been about making great fashion affordable for everyone. We’re proud of this and of how much we have grown. But we know our low prices can’t come at a high cost to the planet. Our challenge with this is that making more sustainable choices typically means higher price tags; we are determined to overcome this and make those choices available at a price that is still affordable for everyone.

Because of our size, we can have a big impact with every change we make – whether it’s committing that 100% of our cotton will be sustainably sourced, organic or recycled, working with our suppliers to halve carbon emissions, or working to pursue a living wage for the people who make our clothes. We’ve been quietly working to become a more sustainable and ethical business for the past 10 years. Today one in four of all the clothes we sell now come from our Primark Cares range of products made from recycled or sustainably sourced materials.

For the last 18 months a team across Primark has been working on developing a set of far-reaching commitments which mark a significant acceleration in the pace and scale of change, requiring us to think differently about how we do business, right from how our clothes are designed and manufactured, through to how we sell them in stores. Our ambition is to offer customers the affordable prices they know and love us for, but with products that are made in a way that is better for the planet and the people who make them.”

Can you tell us more about how Primark has helped to drive sustainability in the apparel industry?

“We have been working towards becoming a more sustainable and ethical business for more than a decade and have already come a long way: our sustainable cotton programme, established in 2013 is the biggest of its kind in the fashion industry and 25% of all our clothes sold today come under our Primark Cares label of clothes made from recycled or more sustainably sourced materials.

The use of more sustainable materials is one way to reduce our scope 3 emissions, which is why our Sustainable Cotton Programme is so important. Since beginning it in 2013, we have worked with agricultural experts and local implementing partners to train farmers in more sustainable farming methods, using less water and less chemicals, whilst improving the crop yield and profits for farmers.

The programme is now established in India, Pakistan and has trained over 140,000 farmers to date in more sustainable farming practices, with 20,000 more planned by the end of next year. We introduced the first more sustainably sourced cotton from the programme into our products in 2017, starting with women’s pyjamas, and have since expanded to include t-shirts, denim, towels, bedding and babywear. In 2020 our products made with more sustainable cotton increased to over 60 million items.

Additionally, our work to become a more sustainable business also includes working through third party initiatives such as the United Nations’ Fashion Charter, which we joined in 2020, and Textiles 2030, the WRAP initiative to accelerate the fashion and textile industry’s move towards circularity and system change in the UK, which we joined in 2021. Primark continues to expand its Primark Cares label – clothing and other products which are made using more sustainable materials or manufacturing methods which now account for more than a quarter of all clothing sales.

We have a global team of over 130 experts in ethical trade and environmental sustainability, based in our key sourcing countries and working directly with our supply chain, internal colleagues and industry experts, to drive better social and more sustainable practices.”

What do you believe are the most critical challenges that we need to overcome to implement a circular fashion system?

“There is commitment from the industry to increase the use of recycled content in our materials. To achieve this, we need to work together to enable the infrastructure to sort and recycle textile waste. There has been significant development in textile recycling technologies in the last few years to recycle blended fibre fabrics, which we need to support to bring these to scale. That is an important part of the picture when it comes to circularity.

Committing to circularity will also demand big changes to the way we design and make our clothes. We will need to use materials that are recycled or more sustainably sourced. Circular design will also mean stopping some of our current design practices and starting some new ones: jeans might now be designed with removable buttons, for example or metal rivets could be replaced with stitches.

At Primark, this means our clothes will comply with our new enhanced Durability Standard. We must stop providing hangers to customers automatically because they may end up in bins and landfill. And we will stop using fossil fuels in our own operations and use only renewable energy. None of these are easy changes but they are the right ones.”

How do you think the Circular Fashion Partnership can make an impact in Bangladesh?

“In our industry, we know we cannot tackle social and environmental issues in isolation to bring about industry-wide sustainable change and to create a circular system will require collaboration with partners across the industry like the Global Fashion Agenda and Reverse Resources, who are critical in creating systemic change that is needed to truly create change and impact. Our manufacturers in Bangladesh will learn how to segregate their textile waste and get the most value from that waste before connecting with recyclers who can turn that waste into new textiles.”

What does an ideal future for circular fashion look like to you?

“In the future there will be no such thing as waste. ‘Waste’ will be classified as a valuable resource.”

 

Read more about the Circular Fashion Partnership HERE.

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Mostafiz Uddin is quite the phenomenon of the fashion industry. As the Managing Director of Denim Expert Ltd (2009) and Founder and CEO of Bangladesh Apparel Exchange (BAE) (2016), Mostafiz is a visionary entrepreneur who owns a niche, environmentally sustainable and socially responsible compliant garment manufacturing plant in Bangladesh. He is contributing to the development of a transparent and sustainable apparel ecosystem, both regarding social conditions for his employees and material wise. With a natural charm and strong work ethic, he is considered to be a game changer and sees the introduction of sustainable practices, innovations and fashion disruptions as keys to the future of fashion.

Even though Mostafiz is a selfless promoter of responsible business, transparency and circularity in the global apparel industry, he received Honourable Mention in the Economic Forum’s ‘Excellence in Sustainability’ category, November 2020. He is also a strong supporter of the recently launched Circular Fashion Partnership, so we asked him four quick questions:

 

What inspired you to make a difference in the apparel industry?

“I believe to bring change the best way is to set example. So, this belief inspired me to a make difference in the apparel industry. I tried to establish my factory Denim Expert Limited as a model of practicing sustainability. I also as an individual put my best efforts to bring positive changes in Bangladesh apparel industry.”

 

Can you tell us more about how you have helped to drive sustainability in the apparel industry?

“Practicing sustainability knowledge is very important. From my organization Bangladesh Apparel Exchange (BAE) I have launched several annual initiatives such as Bangladesh Denim Expo, Sustainable Apparel Forum (SAF), Bangladesh Fashionology Summit etc to equip the country’s apparel industry with the knowledge to drive sustainability. The initiatives are also making the bridge between the apparel manufacturers, buyers, policy makers of the country and experts to accelerate the momentum of sustainability.”

 

What do you believe are the most critical challenges that we need to overcome to implement a circular fashion system?

“The fashion’s supply chain now follows traditional linear manufacturing system. They do have any proper demonstration of circular business yet. So, a massive capacity development is required to make the shift towards circularity. As circularity is something which cannot be inspired and encouraged through compliance, buyers could offer incentives to manufacturers to encourage practising the circularity. The incentives could be in the forms of good price or their commitments of placing good orders for longer period of time. However, we the manufacturers should also embrace circularity not only for the global demand of circular products is increasing, but also for being responsible in our business by ourselves. Manufacturers should not always wait for buyers’ intervention rather they should be also proactive in promoting circularity.”

 

How do you think the Circular Fashion Partnership can make an impact in Bangladesh?

“Of course. The Circular Fashion Partnership is the first of its kind in Bangladesh. To my knowledge, this is for the first time such a partnership has been formed to promote circularity in Bangladesh which is the 2nd largest apparel exporting country in the world. So, I believe that it will have also a big impact on the global fashion industry. I congratulate and thank P4G, Global Fashion Agenda, BGMEA, Reverse Resources, Bestseller, OVS and all the parties involved for launching the partnership.”

 

READ MORE about the Circular Fashion Partnership.

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

For Camilla Skjønning Jørgensen, Sustainable Materials & Innovation Manager at BESTSELLER, it’s all about being holistic.

“Walk the talk” is this plant-based woman’s approach to life, and since she loves the fashion industry, she wants to make sure it’s as sustainable as can be. Having been with BESTSELLER for 16 years, starting out within Buying and Design, Camilla became more and more sustainability conscious in her approach and solutions. Her actions led to the start of sustainable collections for various BESTSELLER brands, and since 2018 she has led the company’s overall sustainability innovation strategy, Fashion FWD Lab; aiming to drive sustainability to the next level both within BESTSELLER and within the fashion industry.

Therefore, Camilla and her team didn’t hesitate to participate in the Circular Fashion Partnership focusing on recycling in Bangladesh because if you want to make a change, you need to walk the talk. We asked her four quick questions:

 

What inspired you to want to make a difference in the apparel industry?

“Experiencing first hand, as a buyer and designer in BESTSELLER, that the choices and actions I made had a large scale impact, is what prompted me to keep pushing for changes and new ways of working more sustainable.

“I loved the fashion industry but was also aware of the challenges it faced in regards to sustainability. At the time I was responsible for a sub collection in VERO MODA and by slowly shifting what I could into more sustainable material choices, I gained more and more knowledge about what I could do. In the end, my actions led to the start of VERO MODA’s first more sustainable collection. This led to another opportunity working with SELECTED to convert their material use into more sustainable materials. Now I operate at corporate level where we set the strategy for our shift towards more sustainable materials for all BESTSELLER brands and work tirelessly with innovation to enable BESTSELLER to be circular by design in a near future.”

 

Can you tell us more about how BESTSELLER has helped to drive sustainability within the company and in the wider apparel industry?

“Since 2018 we have had our sustainability strategy, Fashion FWD, which works as a driver for our work in BESTSELLER. In my team, which focus on innovation and materials, we work with innovative pilots where we connect stakeholders, brands, suppliers and innovators. With that we spark a structural change that can drive sustainability to the next level – both within BESTSELLER and within the industry.”

 

What do you believe are the most critical challenges that we need to overcome to implement a circular fashion system?

“We need innovation to reach commercial stages with prices, volumes and qualities and we need a systemic change where the innovation gets implemented into supply chain structures and into brands. This can only happen when combining fashion industry level, policy level and country and local government level. No company alone can solve this and make the systemic change.

“We also need quality input designed for circularity, waste stream structures, innovations that can use waste as feedstock for new materials, and brands which will implement it in their designs – and of course customers willing to buy the products.”

 

How do you think the Circular Fashion Partnership can make an impact in Bangladesh?

“Fashion is “market reactive” – if brands send a strong signal to suppliers about wanting more recycled materials, and if we on top of that support the work that needs to be done to make this a reality – then I actually don’t see why it would not happen or not make an impact. It is possible as the waste is already where the industry is: in Bangladesh. We have recyclers; we have the suppliers and the brands looking for this material. All we need is to connect the dots and do the work. Of course, it is not as easy as it sounds. But it is possible and thus achievable.”

 

READ MORE about the Circular Fashion Partnership.

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

“Waste is only waste if it goes to waste.” Often (and easily) said words, but Nin Castle, Co-Founder, Lead of Recycling and Chief Project Officer at Reverse Resources, is translating these words into action. Ever since she was a student of Fashion Design with Business, Nin knew that even though she had a passion for fashion and what clothes means for your personal expression, there was something completely wrong with the fashion industry.

 

Castle owned Goodone, an award-winning sustainable fashion label, from 2006 to 2015, and she has been a part of the equally impressive Reverse Resources since 2017 – developing software solutions for major fashion brands, their garment suppliers and recycling partners to reuse production leftovers. The company’s long-term goal is to build a platform for virtual traceability of circulating resources through different lifecycles, a global database that supports scaling up various innovative circular business models for fashion industry.

In the recent years Reverse Resources has done a thorough research among major factories in China and Bangladesh, and its unique insight and technology means it is a perfect partner to help deliver the Circular Fashion Partnership in Bangladesh. To learn more, we asked Nin three quick questions:

 

What inspired you to want to make a difference in the apparel industry?

“I realised when I was studying back in 2001 that clothes, expression and identity were fascinating however that there was also something fundamentally wrong with the industry and how it worked. In reflection I was an influential student inspired by books such as Naomi Keins ‘No logo’, and Jospeh Stiglitz ´Globalisation and its discontents’. During the early 2000’s with the emerging trend of fast fashion, fashion was suddenly not only an aesthetic representation of culture and attitude but also the industry itself was a reflection of unethical and environmentally damaging global supply chains. The fantastic promise of globalisation to bring wealth and prosperity to developing countries seemed to be drastically failing and I’ve been working in this sector ever since I graduated.”

 

Can you tell us more about how Reverse Resources has helped to drive sustainability in the apparel industry?

“Reverse Resources is a systems thinking company, when mapping out future circular supply chains we saw that there was a massive gap, nobody was really looking into the issue of waste itself.  There was no data on waste, brands and other organisations had no bench marks on waste, no access or control of the waste produced.  What was traditionally waste, was about to become feedstock and resource for a new circular industry.  We saw that the low hanging fruit was post industrial waste as this was the most easy to recycle and we have been busy organising waste streams and bringing down the market barriers to make life as easy as possible for recyclers so that they can be profitable and grow at the speed needed.”

 

How do you think the Circular Fashion Partnership can make an impact in Bangladesh?

“In my opinion Bangladesh has the most valuable textile waste of any country, their factories are famous for producing large volumes of cotton knit products, the most valuable and sought after waste in todays recycling market.  Today though Bangladesh is the worlds largest exporter of textile scraps which represents a real system loss for the country.  At the same time with scaling mechanical textile recyclers and emerging chemical cellulosic recyclers there is real potential for Bangladesh to position itself as a leader in circularity. By tracing the circulation and valorisation of waste within the country we can prove the positive economic and environmental impact of the Circular Economy, creating a blue print for other countries to follow.”

 

READ MORE about the Circular Fashion Partnership.

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.

Dear GFA Community,

As we usher in 2023, I want to take a moment to extend my warmest wishes for the new year and to thank you for your unwavering support throughout 2022. It is thanks to your dedication and commitment to our cause that we have continued to build a thriving and global GFA community.

2022 marked a pivotal year for GFA; we hosted our Summit outside of Copenhagen for the first time in its 13-year history, announced landmark alliances and partnerships, launched new impact programmes and published collaborative reports.

Amidst GFA’s breakthrough announcements and developments, 2022 was undeniably also shadowed by extreme weather events, uncertain economic landscapes, geopolitical strife, and both environmental and social challenges. These adversities exemplified the need for GFA to keep working towards its mission of a net-positive fashion industry, that gives back more to the natural world, people and societies and the economy than it takes out. Every industry is navigating the repercussions of such turbulent times, but it is imperative that we remain strong-minded and united in our ambitions for a better future.

As we look ahead to 2023, I want to emphasise that the changes you now make, individually or collectively, can have impact well beyond the fashion industry. Let’s lead by example and inspire other industries by demonstrating the many opportunities that can be created when we steer our impact strategies with a net-positive mindset and collaborate with actors across the value cycle.

I wish you all a wonderful festive period full of gratitude and hope. We very much look forward to continuing to inspire, educate and mobilise the industry in 2023 to generate even greater impact.

Best wishes,

Federica Marchionni, CEO

Happy Holidays 2022

Read our latest article exploring what happened in the fashion industry in 2022 here

Our Highlights From 2022

Copenhagen Edition

Hosted in the grand setting of the Royal Opera House, Copenhagen, on 7-8 June, the event convened over 900 leaders to drive urgent action.

Attendees heard from over 100 speakers including HRH The Crown Princess of Denmark and representatives from Kering, Bottega Veneta, GANNI, UNFCCC, Vestiaire Collective and many more.

Multiple companies chose to announce their latest sustainability measures at the landmark event including Ralph Lauren Corporation, Apparel Impact Institute, Fashion Revolution, Mulberry and more.

Ticketholders had the opportunity to meet with 24 in-person and 51 digital Innovation Forum exhibitors. Over 450 business meetings between fashion companies and sustainable solution providers were facilitated.

Read more here and relive the content in our on-demand library here.

Singapore Edition

Building on the learnings from Copenhagen, on 3 November, Global Fashion Summit assembled over 300 stakeholders representing manufacturers, garment workers, retailers, brands, suppliers, NGOs, policy, and innovators in Singapore and online to spur industry impact.

Attendees heard from over 50 speakers including representatives from PUMA, Zalando, StandUp Lanka, Singapore Fashion Council and many more.

The Summit’s first international edition facilitated even more conversations with manufacturer and supply chain voices to discuss crucial challenges and opportunities around working collaboratively with brands on equal terms.

Ticketholders had the opportunity to meet with 7 in-person Innovation Forum exhibitors.

Read more here and relive the content in our on-demand library here.

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation

Formally announced at COP27, GFA and its new partner; the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), launched the Fashion Industry Target Consultation (FITC)- seeking public input on cohesive and measurable fashion industry impact targets according to the five priorities of the Fashion CEO Agenda.

The consultation’s official survey is now open until February 2023 for feedback. A series of five online regional workshops co-hosted by GFA and UNEP will also run between January and February 2023 in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, North America, Latin America & the Caribbean, and West Asia for regional participation.

We invite you to take part in the consultation. Find out more and how to participate here.

 

The GFA Monitor

This year saw the unveiling of The GFA Monitor – a new resource designed to guide fashion leaders towards a net positive fashion industry by 2050.  It presents consolidated guidance according to the five core sustainability priorities of the Fashion CEO Agenda.

Building alliances through shared industry knowledge, over 30 partners and organisations were consulted to form a cohesive resource that presents expert insights on the status of the industry, available solutions, clear actions, case studies, and proven best practices. Higg also partnered with GFA to present aggregated performance data across the five sustainability priority areas.

Download The GFA Monitor here.

The Global Circular Fashion Forum

GFA launched the Global Circular Fashion Forum (GCFF), a global initiative, supported by GIZ, to spur local action in textile manufacturing countries to accelerate and scale recycling of post-industrial textile waste. The GCFF will bring together circularity programmes from different organisers to exchange knowledge, pool efforts and share best practices across regions and moreover produce a blueprint to replicate upstream circularity initiatives. It will launch in Viet Nam and Cambodia in 2023 through 2024.

Find out more about the GCFF here.

The Circular Fashion Partnership

The GCFF builds on the Circular Fashion Partnership (CFP) in Bangladesh which facilitates circular commercial collaborations between textile and garment manufacturers, recyclers and fashion brands. Bestseller, Benetton, Teddy Group, H&M Group, Usha Yarns, C&A, Inditex, Kmart, Peak Performance, Cyclo, OVS and Primark are supporting partners that are actively engaged in the Circular Fashion Partnership.

This year, technology partner, Reverse Resources, tracked 6,910,155 kg of textile waste segregated and collected from manufacturers to recycling solutions and onboarded 81 manufacturers to its platform in Bangladesh.

GFA worked to establish funding from UNIDO Switch to Circular Economy Value Chains to continue activities in Bangladesh through 2025.

Find out more about the CFP here.

COP27

GFA worked to place fashion firmly on the COP27 agenda during the conference in Sharm El Sheikh.

To mark the launch of the FITC, GFA and UNEP facilitated two events at COP27 speaking to the importance of holistic, inclusive industry targets to establish an industry-aligned route of travel towards net-positive for both people and planet.

GFA also hosted an event discussing the alliances to decarbonise the fashion value chain. This event built on GFA’s research into cross-sectoral collective action opportunities to finance the increase of renewable energy in manufacturing countries.

Continuing GFA’s partnership with UN Climate Change Secretariat (UNFCCC), Federica Marchionni also contributed to UNFCCC’s Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action event.

Read more about GFA’s activities at COP27 here.

Policy

Following the launch of the EU Textiles Strategy, our CEO, Federica Marchionni and our Public Affairs Director, Maria Luisa Martinez Diez, took part in two high-level roundtables hosted by the European Commissioner in charge of the Environment Virginijus Sinkevičius. Both the Global Fashion Summits in Copenhagen and Singapore have given increased attention to policy and the forthcoming EU Textiles Strategy – with a total of four dynamic policy segments.

Additionally, GFA joined the European Fashion Alliance in June of 2022 as well as the EU Pact for skills. When it comes to the Policy Hub-Circularity for Apparel and Footwear, we lead two EPR roundtables as well as a transparency media masterclass. This was also done alongside a daily follow up, analysis and advocacy actions around seven policy work streams.

New Alliances & Partnerships

In March, GFA forged a new alliance with UN Climate Change secretariat (UNFCCC) to accelerate the fashion industry’s climate action, which was activated around the organisations’ prestigious forums including GFA’s Global Fashion Summit and the UNFCCC’s annual Fashion Charter meeting and Conference of Parties (COP). Read more about the alliance here.

At Global Fashion Summit: Singapore Edition, Global Fashion Agenda (GFA) announced a new partnership with BBC Storyworks Commercial Productions to launch a new branded film series on social and environmental sustainability in the fashion industry, which will be released to a wide audience on a dedicated BBC.com microsite in 2023. Members of the GFA network are invited to share their stories for potential inclusion in this commercial series. Read more about the project here.

Building further alliances, GFA partnered with Sustainable Apparel Coalition (SAC) to host the SAC Annual Meeting and Global Fashion Summit back-to-back in Singapore in order to complement each organizations strengths, build greater synergy and ensure a more compelling experience for attendees to accelerate greater impact. Read more about the alliance here.

This year, GFA was also delighted to be an official Nominator for the 2022 Earthshot Prize, the most prestigious and ambitious global environment prize in history, designed to incentivise change and aid in the repair of our planet over the next ten years. Explore the winners here.

Furthermore, GFA welcomed three new Associate Partners: Neiman Marcus Group, PUMA, and Vestiaire Collective; a new Data Partner: Higg; five new impact partners: Fair Labor Association, the Social & Labor Convergence Program, Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Apparel Impact Institute, and Textile Exchange, and a Summit Media Partner: FT Live.

Explore all of our partners here

Throughout the year, Global Fashion Agenda has paid close attention to industry developments, noteworthy days and core themes.

To learn more about these explore our latest news page here.

Participate in the consultation

Fashion Industry Target Consultation

The Fashion Industry Target Consultation is a multi-stakeholder project led by Global Fashion Agenda and the UN Environment Programme to identify and converge existing industry aligned targets to establish a holistic industry route of travel towards a net-positive fashion industry.